1 (Refer to FAA-CT-8080-2G, Figure 20, area 2.) Why would the small flag at Lake Drummond of the sectional chart be important to a remote pilot?
A. This is a VFR check point for manned aircraft, and a higher volume of air traffic should be expected there.
VFR Waypoint Chart Program was established to provide VFR pilots with a supplemental tool to assist with position awareness while navigating visually with a GPS. VFR Waypoint names consist of five letters beginning with "VP". VFR waypoints colocated with Visual Checkpoints are portrayed with a purple checkpoint flag.
This example contains one VFR waypoint, Lake Drummond.  When flying in this area, pilots will refer to the VFR checkpoint in their initial contact. For example, "Suffolk Executive, Cessna N19093 at Lake Drummond  entering left downwind for runway 22". In this single transmission, anyone on the CTAF, typically anyone else flying in the area, knows where you are, who you are, and what your intentions are. The 5-letter code below the checkpoint name is the identifier for some RNAV and GPS instruments in the aircraft.
Why is this important to the sUAS pilot?
While an sUAS pilot will not be permitted to transmit on aircraft radio frequencies, you would be encouraged to listen when operating near an airport so that you would be aware of any manned aircraft in your vicinity.  Note, at an untowered airport, radio communications is not required and sometimes aircraft without a radio may be in the airport area.
This is correct.
General Aviation pilots use VFR Checkpoints to identify their location, usally in the vicinity of a small airport.  You can expect additional aircraft traffic near VFR checkpoints.
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Treetop.Academy is operated by MannMade Digital Video (www.mmdv.com)