32 Which technique should a remote pilot use to scan for traffic? A remote pilot should
A. systematically focus on different segments of the sky for short intervals.
This is correct.
Effective scanning is accomplished with a series of short, regularly spaced eye movements that bring successive areas of the sky into the central visual field. Each movement should not exceed 10 degrees, and each area should be observed for at least 1 second to enable detection. Although most pilots seem to prefer horizontal back-and-forth eye movements, each pilot should develop a scanning pattern that is most comfortable and then adhere to it to assure optimum scanning.
There are multiple sources from the FAA that describe this technique.

From: FAA Advisory Circular 90-48D, "Pilots’ Role in Collision Avoidance", Page 3
4.2.4 Eye Movements.
From: Airman's Information Manual (AIM)
Page 8-1-7, "Scanning for Other Aircraft.
From: FAA-H-8083-25B, "Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge"
Chapter 17, Aweromedical Factors, Vision in Flight
Page 17-23, Scanning Techniques
"Because the eyes can focus only on this narrow viewing area, effective scanning is accomplished with a series of short, regularly spaced eye movements that bring successive areas of the sky into the central visual field. Each movement should not exceed 10 degrees, and each area should be observed for at least 1 second to enable detection"
"To scan effectively, pilots must look from right to left or left to right. They should begin scanning at the greatest distance an object can be perceived (top) and move inward toward the position of the aircraft (bottom). For each stop, an area approximately 30° wide should be scanned. The duration of each stop is based on the degree of detail that is required, but no stop should last longer than 2 to 3 seconds. When moving from one viewing point to the next, pilots should overlap the previous field of view by 10°."
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